The Best of Both Worlds: Reflections of a Business Student in a Manresa Class

You have probably heard the rather humorless jokes about “ethical businesspeople” and how oxymoronic that phrase may be. While, unfortunately, there are some immoral people in the business world, students and faculty at Fordham, and especially in the Manresa Program, are working to challenge that stereotype with education and engagement, starting in the classroom.

Last year, I took Lost Interlocutor: Philosophy of Human Nature as well as the Manresa spring symposium on Jesuit Education and Social Justice. In doing so, I gained so much more than simply checking off a core requirement. I improved my eloquentia perfecta skills (if you are not yet familiar with that phrase, you soon will be), engaged with students of diverse backgrounds, and gained a deeper understanding of valuable Jesuit principles.

While the works of Plato and Nietzsche might not arise frequently in a commercial environment, studying them will force you to concretely deliberate abstract ideas, such as truth and justice. The resulting communication skills will prove to be priceless when pitching a new product, explaining stock trends, or managing employees.

An additional asset of the Manresa courses is your classmates. Capped at 15 students, classes are teeming with engaging discussion between students of diverse academic interests who are genuinely interested and up for a challenge. The benefits of this dialogue cannot be understated. By discussing the Jesuit ideas of magis, cura personalis, and Ignatian examen with people of different perspectives, you will gain a deeper understanding of these principles. This effectively translates into a sound personal moral code, essential to being an ethical decision maker and leader.

By engaging in a Manresa course, you will become an ethical business leader and will be well on your way to becoming a man or woman for and with others.

Claire Siegrist, GSB 2018 (studying Information Systems and French)
Manresa Scholar,  2014-2015

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