RA Spotlight: Jenna Koury

A significant part of what keeps the Manresa spirit alive throughout the halls of Loyola are the Resident Assistants (RAs). By keeping the Scholars safe, leading programs, and organizing enjoyable IMG_2207.pngexcursions, the RAs fully embrace the concept of a living-learning community while constantly being individuals on whom you can rely. This week, we introduce rising sophomore and Manresa alumna, Jenna Koury, as the fourth-floor RA in Loyola Hall this upcoming academic year!

Jenna is planning on completing a double major in Middle East Studies and Political Science, with a minor in Sociology. She is also on the Pre-Law track. She is a UNICEF liaison and a member of Fordham’s Mock Trial team. As a Portland, Oregon native, the Bronx is a long way from home, but her love for Fordham is what brought her here. “I chose Fordham because I went to a Jesuit high school, and it was an amazing experience; I wanted to continue that. I also love the emphasis on service that a Jesuit education provides,” she says.

In her freshman year, Jenna developed relationships and found her place at Fordham through the Manresa Scholars Program. “I gained an amazing relationship with my Manresa Professor and the best group of friends I’ve ever had,” she reflects. As an RA for Loyola this year, she hopes to share some of her favorite experiences with the incoming Manresa Scholars. She explains, “I want to take residents to Washington Heights, and get shaved ice as an excursion. I hope to have a lot of programs that will show residents the amazing cultures found in New York.”

Jenna and the rest of the Loyola RA staff are looking forward to welcoming the new Scholars to the Manresa Program in the fall!

Lindsey Register, FCRH 2020
Manresa Programming & Marketing Fellow, 2017-2018

Packing for Life in Loyola

Packing for college is one of the most exciting, yet intimidating, processes you have probably faced thus far in your life. As a Loyola Hall alumna, I came to appreciate the occasional items that don’t initially cross your mind when trying to stock your room with all of the must-haves. I have compiled a personal list of the top ten most helpful items I had in my Loyola room, to pass on to you, the new Manresa Scholars!

1. Umbrella and Rain Boots
I faced my fair share of random rain showers to torrential downpours last year. Whether for a simple walk from Loyola to the Caf, a trek across campus to Faculty Memorial Hall, or even passing through Times Square to get to a Broadway show, my foldable umbrella and trusty rain boots never let me down.

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2. Reusable Water Bottle
Living in Loyola Hall comes with the luxury of your own sink in your room! With easy access to tap water in your room, as well as water bottle filling stations throughout campus, having a reusable water bottle is key to staying hydrated throughout the day.

3. Beach Towel
Laying out on the grass on Eddie’s Parade on a towel or blanket allows for the opportunity to hang out with your friends or study outside on a nice day.

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4. Printer
Having a printer in my room came in handy when having to print a paper or reading for class. There are Fordham printers on campus; however, having your own makes sure that you are always prepared.

5. Command Strips
I loved being able to quickly hang a picture or poster on the wall to add to my room decor. Command Strips, as well as hooks for jackets and towels, are a great addition to your room supplies.

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6. Door Stop
Loyola Hall doors are heavy and can only be opened with your key – having a door stop to prop open the entrance to your room makes it easy for friends to come in and out.

7. Games
My friends and I held weekly “family game nights” in the Seminar Rooms of Loyola – packing your favorite board game or fun card games from home is a great way to bring everyone together.

8. ID Holder
Having your student ID card handy 24/7 is key to getting on campus, entering your residence hall, or swiping into the Caf. I kept mine in an ID holder attached to my lanyard and room key for easy access.

9. Cold Medicine
At least once a semester, there comes a point where almost everyone on campus seems to have come down with a cold – stocking up on your preferred cold medicines beforehand helps to keep you prepared and healthy.

10. Ultimate Snack Stash
A stash of your favorite snacks from home allows for comfort in study breaks as well as a great sharing opportunity with friends. Exposing my northerner friends to the taste of Old Bay seasoning was a great bridge between my Maryland and New York life!

Lindsey Register, FCRH 2020
Manresa Programming & Marketing Fellow, 2017-2018

An Introduction to Shared Expectations

As members of the Manresa community, your living-learning experience is enhanced by authentic participation in shared activities. The Shared Expectations programming model is a way for Scholars to better understand and embrace four key Jesuit values: Learning, Sharing, Serving, and Reflecting.

Manresa Scholars are required to attend at least one program from each category during each semester, but most often, Scholars find themselves coming back for more to engage their intellectual interests and personal passions.

Learning
Programs produced and led by the in-house, live-in Manresa tutors allow students to fulfill their Learning requirement. Beneficial seminars introduce incoming freshmen to college life and the upcoming professional world. Examples include “Email Etiquette: Presenting Yourself Well,” “Writing Your First College Paper,” as well as multiple exam
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Sharing
Through professor led dinner-colloquia or guest lectures, Scholars are able to bother themselves intellectually, outside of the classroom. The programs can link up with themes of the Manresa Seminars, generate discussions on the role of Jesuit values in the world, or present ideas focused on the lives of millennials themselves. Previous topics include “Social Media and the Search for Self,” and “Love,” a Keyword Colloquium with Fordham President, Father McShane (see photo, courtesy of Zach Asato).

Serving
Serving programs tend to leave a significant impact on the Scholars, as service-learning work within a different environment allows for a unique experience. Whether serving food to the homeless in the city, or participating in a park clean-up in the Bronx (see photo), Manresa Scholars develop a better understanding and appreciation of the communities outside of Fordham’s campus.IMG_2944.jpg

Reflecting
This category allows Scholars to explore their relationship with topics such as ethics and justice, and connect more deeply to the spiritual values of the Manresa Program and Jesuit education. These programs are often coordinated in partnership with Fordham’s Campus Ministry and our resident Jesuit Housemaster, Father Lito Salazar, S.J., creating valuable connections for Scholars to carry on beyond their year in Manresa.

Lindsey Register, FCRH 2020
Manresa Programming & Marketing Fellow, 2017-2018

Meet the Staff: Manresa Fellow Lindsey Register

My name is Lindsey Register, and I am Manresa’s Programming and Marketing Fellow for the 2017-2018 academic year. I am a rising sophomore double majoring in Communications & Culture and Environmental Studies. I was also a member of the Manresa Program in my freshman year!thumb_img_1765_1024-1

I am a rower for the Fordham Women’s Rowing team and spend every morning before class out on the Harlem River. I also serve as an editor for the Fordham Maroon yearbook. I love going into the city to try new foods, explore the Met, or stop in for a Soul Cycle class. In the Bronx, you can usually find me either wandering the Botanical Gardens or set up studying in Dagger John’s on campus.

As the Programming and Marketing Fellow, I will be working alongside Dean Parmach and the Manresa staff to plan and coordinate the Shared Expectation programs for the Class of 2021 Manresa Scholars. I am excited to continue my relationship with the Manresa community through a different role, and am looking forward to creating an engaging and memorable experience for the new Scholars starting in the fall!

Manresa Course Spotlight: A Mathematical Playbill to Music

Manresa Scholars will have the opportunity to participate in perhaps one of Fordham’s most unique math courses, “Beats, Vibration and Harmony: A Mathematical Playbill to Music.” Taught by Professor Rolf Ryham, the course will examine classic mathematical concepts found in music. Students will consider pitches, consonance, and dissonance through mathematical properties such as trigonometry, and explore musical scales and symmetry within musical composition. The material does not assume a background in Calculus or music theory.

Students will gain scientific and mathematical writing abilities, learn to model real-world situations through mathematical problems, and utilize software to compute and generate tones. “One of the course highlights is the possibility to step back in history and appreciate how music may have sounded in its original form. Some musicians say that each musical key (C, G, etc.) has a special character well suited to the piece, e.g. a key can feel mellow, or feel aggressive. But in our modern tuning there should in principle be no difference between one key to the next because of the way it’s mathematically constructed,” said Professor Ryham.

The course fulfills the Eloquentia Perfecta 1 and Mathematical/Computational Reasoning core requirements. Therefore, while it is a math course, students will strengthen their writing and speaking skills through papers and presentations where they will use mathematics to explain and describe musical sounds.

“What I hope for students to get from this course is the habit of taking note of the physical and digital world, and using mathematical thinking to describe and make predictions about what they are seeing,” said Professor Ryham.

Anja Asato, FCRH 2018
Manresa Programming and Marketing Fellow, 2016-2017

Seminar Spotlight: American History and Citizenship

The Manresa Scholars Program offers five seminars each semester, and this upcoming fall, we are excited to offer a new history course, “Understanding Historical Change: Fighting for Equal Rights in American History.” Taught by Professor Kirsten Swinth, the course explores episodes in American history through the lens of citizenship.

Together, Scholars consider how different groups of Americans have acquired full citizenship, from political to civil and social rights, and the conflicts that resulted from these expansions in citizenship. “Everything we talk about in this class speaks to what it means to live in America today, from political rights to income inequality and social inclusion. We ask hard questions about what democracy means in America and debate whether or not this nation has fulfilled its promise of full equal citizenship to all its members,” says Professor Swinth.

Course highlights include documentary screenings including 13th, to learn about the history behind Black Lives Matter. Students also take part in a discussion group to discuss the powerful book, Evicted, and the Freedom Schools of the Civil Rights Movement.

The course fulfills the Eloquentia Perfecta 1, Understanding Historical Change, and American Pluralism core requirements for Fordham College at Rose Hill students. As an American Pluralism course, it specifically examines how race, gender, and ethnicity have shaped struggles for citizenship. Students gain Eloquentia Perfecta skills as the course emphasizes participation, speaking, and writing, using effective speech and analytical thought.

In this course, Manresa Scholars are be challenged to explore issues facing modern-day Americans. Professor Swinth hopes that students gain an “understanding of the roots of hotly-debated issues of today and a passion for equality and justice.”

Anja Asato, FCRH 2018
Manresa Programming and Marketing Fellow, 2016-2017

Jesuit Education and Social Justice Symposium

During the spring semester, Manresa Scholars have the opportunity to enroll in the Manresa Spring Symposium, a one-credit course that explores the themes of Jesuit education and social justice. Intellectual discussions are fused with service-related initiatives for an enriching experience that builds upon the Fall Manresa Seminars.

The symposium grows out of the collaboration between Manresa faculty, Jesuit-in-residence house master, residential life staff, and the Office of Mission Integration and Planning and its Dorothy Day Center for Service and Justice. Both on and off-campus, the symposium emphasizes respectful dialogue, reflection, and action in the Jesuit educational tradition.

Each week, the Scholars meet for an engaging guest speaker, or to participate in an off-campus service program. Course highlights include roundtable discussions with retired Jesuits at Murray-Weigel Hall and the facilitation of an after-school program at a Bronx Grammar School.

This week, Scholars examined the following question: What is a Jesuit education supposed to do for college students and the world? Scholars engaged in thoughtful discussion following an interactive presentation by guest speaker, Ms. Joan Cavanagh (center in below photo), from Fordham’s Campus Ministry.

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