A Memorable Spring Semester

The 2016-2017 Manresa Scholars have officially completed their freshman year as Fordham Rams. This year has been filled with rigorous academics, engaged service-learning, and dedication to the Manresa-Loyola Hall community. As Scholars embark on new adventures as upperclassmen, we are confident that the lessons they’ve learned with Manresa will serve them well.

Fordham’s President, Fr. McShane, spent an evening speaking with Manresa Scholars on the topic of “Love” and the “Fordham Family.” A personal conversation with Fr. McShane is a special Fordham experience that Scholars will reminisce about throughout their time at Fordham and after graduation.

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During the NYC Urban Immersion Spring Break Service Project, a group of Manresa Scholars took part in service-learning projects and explored issues such as economic inequality, while practicing simple living for a meaningful and reflective experience.

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Manresa Scholars visited Bartow-Pell Park in the Bronx twice this semester, once to clean up the park grounds and again to help facilitate their annual Easter Egg Hunt.

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Manresa professors concluded the year’s dinner-colloquium series with a “Last Lecture.” Each professor shared their most valued piece of wisdom with Manresa Scholars before they embark on new journeys as upperclassmen.

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Scholars took a break from finals to celebrate the end-of-the-year on the Manresa patio to enjoy burritos and the warm weather.

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An Eggcellent Easter Service Opportunity

To embrace the springtime weather and the final push to Easter Recess, Manresa Scholars took a trip out to Bartow-Pell Park in the Bronx recently to help with the annual Bartow-Pell Easter Egg Hunt. With over 1,000 children expected, ranging from 2-12 years old, our students were put to work to make sure the event ran as smoothly as possible.

Most of the Scholars were stationed at different aged egg hunts, taking on the task of DSC_4844.JPGscattering eggs full of candy for the children to collect in the various hunts throughout the day, as well as creating the perfect hiding spots for the unique golden egg in every hunt that could be turned in for a prize. Others manned the Easter-themed craft tables and organized egg-related lawn games in order to keep the children and their families happy. With endless activities as well as an appearance from the Easter Bunny himself, the expectations of the local community were exceeded thanks to the team effort put in by the Manresa Scholars.

This event counted as a “Serving” program as part of the Scholars’ Shared Expectations. “I really enjoyed serving at the Bartow-Pell Easter Egg Hunt because it allowed me to give back to the community I’m living in and see a different side of the Bronx. It was also really great to see how much fun the kids were having and how much they enjoyed it,” said Melanie Orent, a current Manresa Scholar.

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As volunteers, the Scholars demonstrated true Manresa spirit through hard work, effective communication, and overall enjoyment of the experience as they contributed to this close-knit community beyond Fordham’s campus.

Lindsey Register, FCRH 2020
Manresa Programming & Marketing Fellow, 2017-2018

 

Integrated Learning Community Spotlight: West Wing

The Manresa Scholars program is not the only Integrated Learning Community (ILC) on campus that engages the academic, spiritual, and social components of students’ lives. The West Wing ILC for Ignatian Leadership and Civic Service is a program for sophomores, many of whom were in the Manresa Program as freshmen. Learn more about an exciting service opportunity that West Wing Scholars took part in this semester.


A group of West Wing Scholars headed to St. Francis Xavier Parish Mission recently in search of a meaningful opportunity to learn and serve the Manhattan homeless community. We arrived on site to help Xavier with one of its most important outreach programs– their Sunday meal.

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Image source: XavierMission.org

Throughout the afternoon, the Fordham group was separated and placed into different stations. Some of us greeted guests at the door, handed out trays with meals, or helped clean. When asked about his experience, West Wing Scholar (and former Manresa Scholar) Neil Joyce said, “Serving meals at St. Francis Xavier was a humbling, humanizing experience. It is an experience that teaches one to be forever grateful of the countless liberties they have, while also serving as a call to action to volunteer and serve for and with others.”

WW Scholar Rosalyn Kutsch echoed these sentiments by saying that “Volunteering at Xavier was a startling and valuable reminder of the importance of stepping outside of the comfort we make for ourselves and engaging with the unfamiliar. Most importantly, this work serves to remind use that at the end of the day, we are all humans who all need a little extra help sometimes.”

WW Scholar Brian Daaleman (another former Manresa Scholar) added that those he interacted with “served to remind [him] that those trapped in the cycle of homelessness each have their own unique story and are not just another statistic. Our service also provided a physical representation of the immediacy and gravity of this issue that sadly is often neglected.”

Each job we were given and interaction we experienced was full of meaning and purpose, bringing us closer to the Jesuit tradition of serving those in need as men and women for and with others.

Monica Olveira, FCRH 2018
West Wing ILC Intern, 2016-2017

Emily Mohri, FCRH 2017
West Wing ILC Resident Assistant, 2016-2017


Manresa Fall Semester Highlights

The Manresa experience is filled with academic, spiritual, and personal growth. This past semester, Manresa Scholars had the opportunity to attend over 35 programs focusing on the five Shared Expectations: Sharing, Collaborating, Serving, Reflecting, and Learning.

These evening and weekend enrichment programs are carefully planned to complement what Scholars learn in their Manresa Seminars, while providing additional opportunities for them to come together as a community.

 

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Manresa Scholars took a trip into Manhattan for kayaking on the Hudson River during the first weekend of the semester.

 

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Manresa Resident Assistants, Resident Tutors, and Jesuit Housemaster Fr. Lito Salazar, S.J., enjoyed the Manresa Welcome Picnic, an annual tradition.

 

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Scholars spent a Sunday volunteering at St. Francis Xavier parish, serving food to those in need.

 

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Dean Robert Parmach, the Program’s Faculty Director, took a group of Scholars to explore Central Park on a Friday afternoon.

 

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VP for Mission Integration and Planning Fr. Michael McCarthy, S.J., led a dinner colloquium on the topic of “Immersion,” in which Scholars discussed being part of both the Fordham and Bronx community.

 

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Scholars visited Bartow-Pell Park in the Bronx twice this semester to clean up the park grounds and assist with their annual Harvest Festival for young children.

 

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In collaboration with Campus Ministry’s Ignatian Week, Dean Parmach and Fr. Lito led a colloquium on “Unpacking the Millennial Digitized Mind” to prompt reflection on how social media impacts the ways we think and interact with others.

 

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The Manresa Community celebrated the end of the semester with a formal Christmas Party.

Manresa Scholars Showcase: Amos Ong

Manresa Scholars gathered recently at the evening “Manresa Scholars Showcase” to reflect on the end of their first semester by sharing what they’ve learned and experienced through their Manresa Seminars and Manresa programs. Below is an excerpt from Manresa Scholar Amos Ong, in which he discusses the connections he found between his coursework and a weekend Manresa service project.

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Manresa Scholar Presenters and Program Faculty at the Showcase evening.


Hi everyone, my name is Amos Ong, and the Manresa course I’m currently taking is Ground Floor by Dr. DiLorenzo. Besides being an introductory course to business, Ground Floor truly immerses students in the business world, whether it’s in daily New York Times and Wall Street Journal essays, presentations from highly-acclaimed Gabelli professors, or fun field trips to companies like a European financial firm. In addition, the course pushes you to effectively collaborate with fellow classmates, and learn some ethical business perspectives and practices.

Besides having this unique opportunity, we get additional learning experiences through Manresa programs. One particular program that really moved me was the St. Francis Xavier Welcome Table Serving Program. Fellow Manresa Scholars and I served food and cleaned plates and utensils for disabled and less privileged people in New York City. I must say, this experience revealed a different side of New York for me. Having lived in the Philippines basically my all my life, I got to see poverty everyday in the streets, or at my numerous high school service activities. But, I did not expect to see a similar case in the Manhattan area. My perception of the city with bright lights, Broadway, and $1 pizza completely changed.

The truth of the matter is, poverty and struggle could be seen even in the largest cities of the world. As my medieval history professor would say, poverty, a relative term, exists because wealth also exists. And so, what does this tell me as a business student? Although profit is essential in the development of a business and the whole economy, we must strike a balance between growing our businesses, and try to alleviate the injustices and poverty in the world.

Moreover, the program also changed my perspective of what success in business truly means. Does it only mean having market leadership, global expansion, and high profit earnings? Or, does it also mean solving real world problems that matter? A business may be growing financially, but if it is neglecting problems right in its face, what’s the point?

In a larger perspective, the program was a moving learning experience for me. It was amazing to serve others, and look past each other’s differences.

And I think this sums up the beauty of these programs — how it can help you understand the real world in relation to your career path, but also help you grow as a whole person and deepen your understanding of life.


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